2021 | Rockville

371-unit development planned for former car dealership in Rockville

Community would be at King Buick site

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The proposed 371-unit development would sit between Md. 355 and Pleasant Drive.

Courtesy EYA and City of Rockville

A 371-unit apartment complex is proposed at a former car dealership on the northern end of Rockville.

The city of Rockville staff is working on an annexation agreement for the property, which sits along Md. 355, south of Fedor Avenue.

The project would sit on about 20.5 acres, and include up to 253 townhouses and 118 multi-family units, city staff documents show.

At least 15%, or 55, of those units, are required to be moderately priced dwelling units.

Those units must be affordable according to formulas involving area median income. For instance, a family of four would qualify for living in one if their maximum income is $77,400.

The development would also include a 2,280-square-foot community amenity building. There would be a pool near the center of the property for residents in the community.

Rockville Mayor Bridget Donnell Newton and the City Council were briefed on the proposed development at their July 19 meeting. 

Council Member David Myles asked Jason Sereno, the senior director of development of EYA, the developer of the site, whether there would be public open spaces within the community.

Sereno said that outside of the pool, its surrounding patio and the community center, playgrounds and other spaces throughout the site will be publicly accessible. He added that EYA is working to establish a pedestrian-friendly route to Mattie J.T. Stepanek Park. 

Council Member Beryl Feinberg asked Sereno how EYA would try to limit noise and traffic, to lessen disruptions in the nearby King Farm community.

Construction traffic would be limited off Md. 355, Sereno said. He added that EYA has worked on that approach in various projects within the Washington, D.C., area. 

“It’s about … getting through the process as quickly and efficiently as we can,” Sereno said. “And once we start land development, which is really the most disruptive portion of the process. … Where we stand today, we don’t anticipate this being a phased development.”

Natural buffers like forested areas will help, he said. 

The mayor and City Council will see a final draft of the annexation agreement in September.

The city’s Planning Commission is scheduled to vote in September on whether to recommend approving the proposed development before it reaches the council.

Steve Bohnel can be reached at steve.bohnel@bethesdamagazine.com