2022 | Politics

MCEA rescinds endorsement of Brandy Brooks following sexual harassment allegations

Union endorses County Council President Gabe Albornoz instead

share this

This story was updated at 9:45 a.m. May 5, 2022, to add more details.

The county’s teachers union is rescinding its endorsement of Brandy Brooks, an at-large candidate for the County Council.

Jennifer Martin, president of the Montgomery County Education Association, wrote in a text message Wednesday night that the union’s representative assembly voted to rescind their endorsement of Brooks. 

Brooks is facing sexual harassment charges from a former campaign staffer, but has said she’s staying in the race. The MCEA previously backed Brooks, but decided to rescind its endorsement following the allegations. 

Brooks declined comment via a text message on Thursday.

Martin said the union voted to recommend incumbent Gabe Albornoz, the current County Council president, for an at-large council seat instead.

“The unanimous rescission of Ms. Brooks’ endorsement by our members was not a vote taken lightly: however, considering credible allegations of a hostile workplace and sexual misconduct against Ms. Brooks, MCEA can no longer support her campaign,” the union wrote in a statement. “MCEA’s thoughts are with the victim, and we hope that restorative practices are truly utilized to make the victim whole again. We will have no further comments about this disappointing situation, and instead will focus on electing our endorsed candidates.”

Martin added that both votes required a 58% supermajority. The teachers union’s is another organization that has decided to revoke its endorsement of Brooks, who has lost the support of two other unions in recent weeks. Along with Albornoz, the MCEA has endorsed County Council Vice President Evan Glass, Council Member Will Jawando and former Gaithersburg City Council Member Laurie-Anne Sayles for the remaining at-large council seats.

One is CASA in Action, a political group that works to help elect immigrants and people of color to elected offices across Montgomery County and Maryland. Another is Metro DC Democratic Socialists of America, who “organize to build workplace democracy, demand a right to housing, confront immigration detention profiteers, stand up to Amazon, ensure a just transition, and fight fascism,” according to its website.

Steve Bohnel can be reached at steve.bohnel@bethesdamagazine.com