2021 | News

Frosh won’t seek re-election as attorney general

Plus: Maryland eyes COVID-19 vaccines at school clinics; Game time moved, precautions in place for football game

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Frosh won’t seek re-election as attorney general

Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh will not seek a third term next year.

The Montgomery County Democrat, who turned 75 this month, sent a message to his staff on Thursday morning informing them of his decision. 

The Daily Record on Wednesday first reported sources as saying they anticipated Frosh opting against re-election. [Maryland Matters]

Maryland eyes COVID-19 vaccines at school clinics

In anticipation of federal regulators soon authorizing vaccines for children ages 5 to 11, state and local health officials in Maryland are preparing to launch school-based vaccination clinics and specialty sites for this age group in addition to offering shots at existing clinics. [Baltimore Sun]

Game time moved, precautions in place for football game

The time of the Quince Orchard at Northwest football game has been moved from 6:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Friday in “an abundance of caution for everyone’s safety and for the smooth operations of the entire event,” according to a letter sent out to the communities of both schools.

The decision was made by Montgomery County Public Schools in collaboration with Montgomery County police, according to the letter. [Montgomery Community Media]

More non-prescription meds are coming to vending machines

Vending machines in Maryland can now stock everything from allergy relief to some contraception along with candy or chips under a new state law. 

A license must be obtained from the local jurisdiction for a vending machine; fees are $2.50 statewide. [Capital News Service]

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